Tag Archives: watercolor

Art – Fish, Fish, and more Fish

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In an effort to get caught up, I’m posting three different projects for this one.  Whew!

The first set is from my (last year’s) 3rd/4th graders:  Jellyfish.  First, they drew out their jellyfish very lightly, and then covered it in glue.  While the glue was still wet, they dripped watercolors and let it bleed.  Once the glue was dry, they added the watercolor background and used saran wrap to make it fractal.

This next set was created by my (then) 5th/6th graders.  We were practicing analogous colors.

The final set is from my (then) 7th/8th graders.  The challenge was to have at least one partially behind another, and at least one partially off the page.  I found some free coloring pages and printed them off for the kids to use and swap out.  They were able to trace whichever fishes they liked.  Then, they used oil pastels to make the fishes hyper-colorful.  Finally, they used watercolor to fill in any remaining fish parts as well as the background water.

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Art – Charley Harper Cardinals

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My 5th/6th graders did piece based on the artwork of Charley Harper.  Here’s the picture it was based off of:

Schooled in Love: Charley Harper Cardinals

First, the students drew a birdbath and outlined it gray oil pastel.  Then they used a gray watercolor wash to fill it in.  Once it was dry, they cut it out.  They lined up the birdbath on the second sheet of paper and made a small mark at the top of it in pencil.  They removed the birdbath and drew a cardinal body on the line, like a Hershey’s Kiss.  Next, they drew two dots for the eyeballs, and then drew a “U” and connected the dots at the top.  Inside of that shape, they drew an upside-down “U”, and then a “V” to create the beak.  They colored in the black part with a Sharpie, as well as outlined the cardinal with it.  Once they were done with the body, they used a ruler and a red Sharpie to make the “flapping” wings.  An orange Sharpie was used to color in the beak.  Then they used oil pastels to color in the cardinal and make the branches.  They water-colored the background blue and then glued the birdbath into place.  Finally, using a mix of glue, shaving cream, and glitter, they added puffy snow to the birdbath, the bottom of the paper, and to the branches.  They REALLY loved that part, and it looked pretty awesome!

Art – Free Falling

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This was one of those assignments that I’ll do again ….but differently.  I always kick myself when I do a project, and then when they’re just about done, I realize all the steps I should have taken because, once again, these kids don’t have the background to do the project.  It’s almost like setting them up for failure.  Ugh!

Some of the kids had fun doing it, some of them didn’t – simply because they know they’re capable of better, but they don’t know HOW.

Anyway, this project created some super-funny gems.  We all had a great giggle from them!

I had them partner up and help each other trace around their hands and feet.  Then, they each drew a body and their head spread out, as if they were falling away.  It was supposed to be in their likeness, but some are a little… open for interpretation.  Finally, they water colored everything, and really jazzed up the soles of their shoes!

Art – Cave Dragons

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I wanted something quick and fairly easy to do after working on the Letter Sculptures, so I chose Cave Dragons from  Dynamic Art Projects for Kids, by Denise Logan.  Fabulous book for art teachers, by the way!

I gave the kids general directions on how to draw a dragon.  Some followed my every move, and some chose to do their own thing.  They all turned out magnificent.

In the book, it advises you to use purple carbon paper.  Do you know how hard it’s getting to find that stuff??  I’m sure you can find it online, but I procrastinated a bit on this project, so I couldn’t find any locally.  Instead, for the stalactites and stalagmites, I had the students get their paper good and wet with a light purple wash of color.  Then, they used more pigment to make dark purple areas.  Finally, while the paint was still wet, they sprinkled salt on the paper, and let them dry.  For the next class period, they brushed off the salt, and cut the stalactites and stalagmites out, and finished the project according to the book.

Art – Birch Trees in Fall

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My older group enjoyed this project.  There were a lot of elements that they hadn’t tried yet, such as masking and using a gift card to make the bark.  They really love water coloring, too!

I like how this student split her trunks.

I like how this student split her trunks.

 

Here are more from the class:

Art – Perspective with Scarecrows

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This was a cool project insofar that we didn’t use watercolors.  Instead we used water based markers to achieve the color effect.

This is a great lesson to focus on vanishing points and near vs. far perspective, though the kids thought the scarecrows looked a bit creepy so up-close.  Ha!  Because of that, some of them even purposefully made their scarecrows more like “scary-crows.”  I have the best kids.  🙂

This project was a bit challenging to teach, because I had to constantly remind the kids to think of each area as a “shape” when they were outlining it with the marker because that’s where the color was pulled from when the water was added.  That was a hard concept for them to get.  HOWEVER, if we ever use this marker/watercolor technique again, they’ll have it down pat.

Here are the kids in the process of creating them:

 

Here are some of the “scarey-crows” and scarecrows that were made:

Schooled in Love - Perspective with Scarecrows

Schooled in Love - Perspective with Scarecrows

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Schooled in Love - Perspective with Scarecrows

Schooled in Love - Perspective with Scarecrows

Art – Pumpkins in Perspective

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One of my art classes just completed this project, and they look great for the season!  We used oil pastels for the pumpkin, starting with the color in the middle, and putting a darker color on the bottom, and a lighter color on top.  We used watercolor for the background. 

 

The way the pumpkin was positioned was so different than the average side-view.  I love this perspective!

I like this one's broken stem.

I like this one’s broken stem.

 

Schooled in Love:  Pumpkins in Perspective

Schooled in Love:  Pumpkins in Perspective

Schooled in Love:  Pumpkins in Perspective

Yes, the artist named this, “Yes!!!”