Tag Archives: sculpture

Art – Greek Vases

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Last year, my 5th/6th graders made Greek vases for their sculpture piece.  It’s a pretty involved project, and took several classes to complete.  However, I think they turned out pretty well!

Here are the example pieces I showed the kids.  I took these pictures in the Dallas Museum of Art when I went to visit over the Christmas holiday.

The students first attached a balloon to a bowl and covered it with paper mache.

Then, they rolled up newspaper to make handles and attached a cup to the top, then covered the entire thing with at least two layers of paper mache.

Finally, they painted the vase with copper and black acrylic.  They each picked a Greek myth they liked and used that as a reference to paint on the vases.

They looked great at our annual art show!

Art – Makin’ Monsters

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I try to do at east one sculpture during the year with each class.  Sometimes it’s plaster; sometimes it’s wire, and sometimes it’s paper mache.  This was the year of paper mache for sure!  As the kids get older, they enjoy challenges, so I try to make each year a little harder than the last.  For my 7th/8th grade class, the challenge was to make a monster that was 2 feet tall, and could stand without support.

The first step was to draw out their monster.  I think this was the most difficult step of all!  I asked them to not make a monster that’s been “used” before, such as in movies or even other projects.  We talked about structure, and what types of things (legs, tails, etc.) a monster could have to act as sneaky supports.  The monster also had to have eyes and a mouth.  Looking back, I should have added a width limit, because some of these monsters got REALLY wide!  As in almost 4 feet!  Whoops…

The first thing was to start building the parts of the monster out of nothing but newspaper, masking tape and foil.  This also lent a challenge to the students.

Once the monster parts were built, they were put together and adjusted to be able to stand up.  Some designs only had two legs starting out, but quickly went to three legs or two legs and a tail to keep the balance.

Schooled in Love:  Makin' Monsters

After the monsters were assembled and structurally sound, the students added 3 layers of paper mache.  Some of the kids are finally at age where they’re really paying attention to the smoothness of the final product, and they think about this as they go.  It’s good to see them want to be proud of their work!  Some monsters were significantly bigger than others, so when the students with smaller monsters got finished, they helped out with the larger ones.  Teamwork!

Schooled in Love:  Makin' Monsters

Once the three layers were applied and dried, the next step was to add the primer.  I make my own using glue and white acrylic paint.

Schooled in Love:  Makin' Monsters

Once everything was nice and white, it was time to paint them.  This project took a long time, but the end result was work it.  Here are the completed monsters at the show:

Art – The 2015 Art Show

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I know, I know… It’s the end of July and I’m STILL posting for the school year.  But it is what it is.

We had our art show at the St. Sabina Gym this year.  A HUGE thank-you to the Altar Society for reserving the gym.  This helped IMMENSLY with the cost.  Remember – we’re a co-op, and we don’t have the luxury of tax-paid gyms or large spaces (or supplies, paper, tables, chairs, etc.).  Everything we do comes out of pocket or from donations.  The Altar Society was able to use our art show to have a bake sale and raise money, and we were able to scratch each other’s backs this way.

We started setting up about 9:00 on the morning of May 8th.  The show was scheduled to begin later that day at 6:30pm, and it was time to rock and roll.  Let me say this up front:  I could NOT have done this without the help of the adults and students who came in.  Some stayed a couple of hours, and others stayed for most of the day.  They were a HUGE HELP!

This next year’s show is schedule for April 29th.  It’s a little earlier in the year, but it seems the beginning of May is difficult for most families because of graduation, soccer nationals, and other end-of-the-year things.  Having it a week or so earlier should help ease that.  We’ve also reserved the day before to start the set-up.  I think this will help with the stress-overdrive that happens about 3 hours before the show opens, when we’re all scrambling to get things put up.  If I can get the pillars and panels set up as well as the lay-out for the projects done the night before, we can start hanging things a LOT earlier.

Enough talking!  On to the show…

But first!  Thank-you to my hubby of 20 {fabulous} years for taking all these pictures AND taking the day off to help set up!  I love you, Chris!

This first set is the overall view of the show.  We added another set of panels this year and had four pillars.  We also utilized the walls.  We had two activity tables:  the draw-what-you-want table with kraft paper, and the make-a-dot table.  Both were a hit!

Here’s the first pillar:

This next set is the pictures that were on the perimeter walls of the gym.

Here’s a our “Make-A-Dot” station.  Apparently the “M” got put in the wrong place.  Maybe next year…

The 7th/8th grade woven circles looked beautifully placed here.  It was SUCH a great idea from one of the helpers, because I couldn’t get them to hang on a panel.

Here are the 5th/6th grade Day of the Dead skulls:

The first panel set:

I just love the way the volunteer arranged these fish paintings made by my 7th/8th graders!

The monsters, made by my 7th/8th graders:

The second panel set:

The high school Trophy Animal Heads:

The second pillar:

The Greek vases, made by my 5th/6th graders:

The third panel set:

Paper mache bowls, created by my 3rd/4th graders:

The third pillar:

Yarn and foil designs, created by my 5th/6th-graders:

The fourth panel set:

The perspective project, by my high schoolers:

Here’s our center piece:  a chandelier in the style of Dale Chihuly, using water bottles.  It was definitely the star of our show!  When the a/c came on in the gym, it made our chandelier slowly spin.  How cool was that?  This was made primarily by my Wednesday class, but other classes helped to paint the bottles because there were so many.  I think we used almost 300.

Schooled in Love:  2015 Art Show

Here’s the bake sale and refreshment station.  Thank you again to the St, Sabina Altar Society for lining up the use of the gym!

Art – Making Masks

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If you’re an art teacher, and you haven’t heard about Art Room Aid from Dick Blick, you’re missing out!  It’s a great way to ask for what you need, because you just might be blessed by an angel willing to cover the cost of the supplies!  This is how we were able to make the masks in my high school class.  Thank you again, angel, whoever you are!

We did these at the end of last year, but between all the end-of-the-year stuff I normally have to do, the totally awesome art show, my daughter graduating high school, and packing up the entire school to move to a new building, by the time everything was said and done, I “checked out” for the summer, and all I did was create artist trading cards for the last month.  It was SO good for my soul!  Now, I’m getting back in the swing of things, as we’ve had to move into a new building (3 stories!), and that’s a LOT of steps!  I should have buns of steel by the end of the year, since I’m on the second floor.

Now, on to the masks!

The students paired up and decided who would go first to have the mask done to them.  Some people get nervous about their mouths being covered, and some people have more issues with their eyes, so I had the partners ask the models which made them more nervous, and they would cover that part last.  I also played music to help the models relax, and I used my son as a model to walk them through the steps.  The partner creating the mask then smeared a LOT of Vaseline all over their model’s face, making sure to add extra along the hairline, eyebrows, and eyelashes.  I pre-cut the bandages into workable pieces, which really helped a lot.  Once the petroleum jelly was thoroughly applied, they took two bandages, dipped them into water, and created an “X” between the models’ faces,  After that, they were to take bandage, wet them, and smooth them over the forehead, down the sides, and over the jawline.

 

Then, it was on to the rest of the face, making sure every bandage laid partially across another one to connect them.

 

Once we had their faces covered, we had a little fun taking selfies with them and such.  The models were instructed to just lay there and relax.

 

Once the masks were dried, even the models joined in on the fun!  They tried walking to each other, writing, and dancing.  It was really funny!

 

When they were finally done horsing around, it was time to remove the masks.  We allowed the models to remove their own masks, because no matter how much we tried to cover potential tender spots with Vaseline, some hair did get caught in the plaster.  I asked the models to smile and scrunch their faces and wiggle their jaws around to release the masks.  Some had a harder time than others, but all the masks were removed in good order.

Schooled in Love:  Making Masks

This one looked a bit like the joker!

 

We put the masks on cups to help support and keep the shape while we were gone over the weekend, and when they were good and dry, the students began decorating them.  Originally, my plan was to have them paint the masks, but I gave them an option to collage, and they liked that idea.  I had them cut out words from magazines that described them.  Some words were serious, and some were just plain silly (which completely works for these guys).  They used a homemade glue/water sealer to affix them, and they all turned out great!

 

To hang them in the art show, they punched holes where the temples would be, and tied string in the back.  Then we used pushpins to put them on the panels.  They looked like they were coming out of the wall!

A Mask of Me

A Mask of Me

Art – Bottle Birds

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For this project with my high schoolers, we recycled wine bottles.  In order to get enough bottles, I just had to ask my co-op, and viola, they appeared.  Don’t judge!

 

They started out by filling the bottle with pea gravel to weigh down the bottoms.  Then, they stuck a long, heavy gauge wire into the neck, and all the way down to the gravel.  After that, they used newspaper and masking tape to make the neck, head, and beaks of the birds.  I told them they could design this bird any way they wished, and we had some very ingenious outcomes!  They were also allowed cardboard to make the wings or any other body parts they liked.

Schooled in Love:  Bottle Birds

 

Once they had the body, neck, head, beak, and wings formed, the students paper mached the entire sculpture to create the bird.

After layering it with paper mache, they let it dry, and then primed it.  I hate buying primer, so I make it by using a one-to-one ratio of white acrylic paint to white school glue.  Once the primer dried, it was time to paint the birds.  They turned out beautifully!  I am so proud of my high school girls!

Art: Letter Sculptures

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This was a huge project (as most paper mache projects are), and it took f o r e v e r because of all our snow days!  that being said, the kids loved how they turned out.  If they’re proud of the finished project, that’s what matters, right?

Let’s get down to business:

First I gave each student two panels of cardboard that I cut from a box.  They also used a paper cup, a ruler, a pencil, and a marker.  They measured the widest part of the cup (the rim), and it was 3″.  Then, they drew their first name initial to the size of the cardboard.  With a ruler, they made the letter block-styled, keeping the width at least three inches.  Once they had the letter drawn out, I had them run the cup all through the letter just to make sure.  Finally, they used the marker to trace the line, and then cut it out.

Schooled in Love:  Letter Sculptures

For the next step, they were instructed to trace the letter onto the second cardboard panel and cut it out.  Then, I gave them a stack of cups and they glued them to the surface of the one of the letters, alternating the cups going up and down.  When they finished, they put glue (tricky!) on the tops of the cups, and laid the other letter on top.  It’s a good idea to lay something heavy on them, to keep the glue in contact with the cardboard until it dries.

Schooled in Love:  Letter Sculptures

The third step was to paper mache the dried letters.  This was described as fun, messy, gross, warm, and cold (depending on how fresh the paste was).  The best way I know how to make paste is to put all-purpose flour in a bowl, add some very hot water, and using an electric mixer, stir and keep adding water until you get the consistency of pancake batter.  Once it’s done, mix in about a tablespoon of bleach.  This way, if you need to keep it for the next day, it won’t mold.  I told the kids to criss-cross their strips of paper to build strength.

Once the letters were covered with paper mache, and they were good and dried, the kids added primer.  Now, I don’t like to buy primer paint, because I have so many kids, and it’s friggin’ expensive, so I make my own by mixing 1 part white acrylic paint to 1 part white glue.

At last the letters were ready to paint!  The students used acrylic, and if you’ve never tried the cheap paints vs. the good ones (more expensive), then you haven’t lived…  You totally get what you pay for!

Here are the finished letters!  Some students chose to paint it a solid color, and some chose to paint a pattern or a picture.  They all turned out great!