Tag Archives: paint

Art – Space Odyssey

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My high school kids got a chance to do something they’ve been wanting to do for a very long time:  spray paint art!  If you’re wondering why, let me break it down for you.  High schoolers + spray paint = love.

 

We were able to get all of them done in one class period, which was a bonus – for us, and for the school, because the fumes were horrendous, and although we did it outside, the smell made its way into the school.  We had to leave our windows open for the day, which wasn’t a bad thing, since the weather’s back to being nice again.

 

The color choices I had for the kids were yellow, orange, red, turquoise, purple, pink, dark blue, and lime green.  There was also two cans of black, a white, and a clear.  You have to get glossy, or it won’t work.  You’ll also need newspaper (to cover the work space and the drying area), cans of different sizes, blue painter’s tape (to hold down the paper while you spray), old magazines, posterboard that has a glossy side, and nitrile gloves.

 

First, they had to decide where their three planets were going to be.  Then, they had to pick out which three colors they wanted each planet to be, and lay down the lightest color first, followed by the medium color, and then the darkest.  Next, some of them took a page from a magazine and slightly crumpled it and pressed or twisted it into the wet paint, creating beautiful swirls or marks of color.  Once that was done, they shaded the planet by making a “C” on the lower side of where their planet would go.

When they finished that part, they laid out their cans to use as masks, and then sprayed their “mountainous range,” using two or three colors (lightest down first!), and sprayed the entire paper black.  Then, they pooled some white on their fingers and flicked it on the paper to make stars and removed the cans.  Finally, while the paint was still wet, they used crumpled magazine pages to remove the black on the mountains.  If the paint started to dry out, they used clear to reactivate it.  That’s it!

 

And here are all the finished pieces:

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History: Quetzalcoatl Scupltures

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We had a special project for Chapter 32: The American Kingdoms.  I went out to Art in History and ordered 16 of the Aztec Quetzalcoatl sculptures.  The kids had a GREAT time painting these, and if you’re a homeschooler, or even if you have a classroom environment, like we do, I HIGHLY recommend this company!  Each sculpture comes with everything you need:  the sculpture, Styrofoam plates (for palettes), a NICE brush, a sponge, paint, and a great box to store it in.  Yes, even the packaging is nice!

I’d like to give a special shout-out to Brian Card.  He’s the regional manager, and he held my hand through the entire process.  I was even sent a free sample to try out before buying the 16 sculptures!  He’s the bomb-diggety.

The entire process took three class periods.  It’s important to emphasize that while the sculptures need two coats of paint, the paint dries fairly quickly.  However, you’ll still want to allow for enough time when painting them.

Here’s our process:

And here are the finished results!

Level 2 Art: Monster Blobs

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I totally got a kick out of this project.  These kids of mine (yes, I claim them ALL) are so dang funny!

I thinned out some black acryllic paint with water.  Then, the students each had a straw and made a couple of drops of the paint on a piece of paper.  They took said straw and blew into it, moving the paint until they were happy with the form. (Note:  Blow VERY close and forcefully, if you want a nice feathering effect.)  Can you say dizzy?

Once that was done, at least 3 times in different spots on the paper, they dripped a few small droplets of paint on there as well, and left them that way to dry.  After all the paint dried, they got out their Sharpies (I love me some Sharpies, by the way) and kept turning their paper until they saw a “monster.”  Really, the only rule I had was that the monster had to have a definitive mouth and at least one eye.  All the rest, they could play with.

After the doodling, they used a light wash of watercolors to give it more personality.  I’m secretly hoping they accidentally leave them here at the end of the year.  They’re all so different!

Here's Annika's.  She's very detailed in her drawing.  I love her wings!

Here’s Annika’s. She’s very detailed in her drawing. I love her wings!

Here's Katies.  She's got some fun ideas!

Here’s Katies. She’s got some fun ideas!

This one's Faith's.  I like how she used different watercolors to emphasize parts of her monsters.

This one’s Faith’s. I like how she used different watercolors to emphasize parts of her monsters.

Here's mine!  The younger kids appreciate good toilet humor when they see it...

Here’s mine! The younger kids appreciate good toilet humor when they see it…