Tag Archives: lungs

Blood and Guts – Lungs Dissection

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We just love to get down and dirty with our anatomy class!  We’re finishing up our study on the Respiratory System, and today we got the awesome chance to dissect a couple of cow lungs.

We had two sets, so I divided the class in half to allow the kids more hands-on teamwork.  They really liked this dissections because it was so big, BUT it didn’t have the awful smells of the GI Tract (I’m STILL gagging) and the kidneys.

Here are some pictures of our fun experience:

Here’s an awesome video of us blowing air in a lung to inflate it!

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Blood and Guts – Lapbook, Lesson 6

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Wait.  Lesson 6?  What happened to Lesson 5?!?!  Lesson 5, in Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology happens to be nutrition, and I decided that, while it is important, we needed to focus on the body parts.  So, we skipped Lesson 5, and (if we have time at the end of the year) we’ll visit it.

Lesson 6 covers the Respiratory System, so don’t forget to breathe.  We’ve already done some fun things, including building a couple of models and an experiment, and our lung dissection is scheduled for next week.

Lapbook:  Lesson 1 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 2 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 3 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4B can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lessons 7 and 8 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 9 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 10 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 11 can be found here.

For this section of our Mega-Monster lapbook, I used Scholastic’s The Body Book, by Donald M. Silver and Patricia J. Wynne, along with some of my own foldables you’ll find below.

L6 Lapbook – 3 parts of the pharynx

L6 Lapbook – Asthma

L6 Lapbook – Bronchi and Bronchioles

L6 Lapbook – Cilia

L6 Lapbook – Cold Virus

L6 Lapbook – Diaphragm

L6 Lapbook – Humidity

L6 Lapbook – Icky Things Our Body Inhales

L6 Lapbook – Mucus

L6 Lapbook – Nasal Cavity Diagram

L6 Lapbook – Nasal Conchae

L6 Lapbook – Nose Hairs

L6 Lapbook – Smoking

L6 Lapbook – Sneeze

L6 Lapbook – The respiratory system includes

L6 Lapbook – Vocal Chords

L6 Picture – Healthy vs Smoker

Here are the pictures:

This is the section as it's first opened.

This is the section as it’s first opened.

 

The middle flap is lifted up.

The middle flap is lifted up.

 

The side is opened to the left.

The side is opened to the left.

 

Here, I've added the inflatable lungs we made in class.  They'll fold up into the lapbook.

Here, I’ve added the inflatable lungs we made in class. They’ll fold up into the lapbook.

 

 

 

 

Blood and Guts – The Lungs

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I decided to make one gigantic post for this one (well, all but the dissection – which is next week!).

I always love, love, love lab day in science.  I really wish we had two hours to do what we need to, but we only have our 45-minute allotment.  Because of the time restriction, we have to h-u-s-t-l-e when we build models and/or do experiments.  It requires the kids to stay focused and act quickly.  Sometimes that can be a little hard, especially if there’s a lot to cover.  Today was one of those days: a lot to cover, and not a lot of time.  The kids (as usual) did wonderfully.

We’re on Lesson 6 (respiratory system) now, because we skipped Lesson 5 (nutrition).  If we have enough time at the end of the year, we’re add that to the end.  Yes, it’s important, but I felt it was more necessary to cover the parts first.

For today’s lab on the lungs, we built two models and did one (very) quick experiment.  In the first model, we built lungs, and in the second model, we showed how the diaphragm is responsible for inflating and deflating the lungs by pulling and pushing them.

Here’s how we built the lungs:

We started out with two candy bags.  You can find these at Walmart or at a craft store where the cake decorating/candy making stuff is.

We started out with two candy bags. You can find these at Walmart or at a craft store where the cake decorating/candy making stuff is.

 

Next, using Sharpies, we drew a whole lung on one bag and the bronchus and alveoli on the other.

Next, using Sharpies, we drew a whole lung on one bag and the bronchus and alveoli on the other.

 

Then we outlined them in black.

Then we outlined them in black.

 

We placed a straw in each bag.

We placed a straw in each bag.

 

Finally, we gathered the tops and tightly taped them around the straws.  We also taped the two straws together to represent the bronchial tubes.

Finally, we gathered the tops of the bags and tightly taped them around the straws. We also taped the two straws together to represent the bronchial tubes.

 

Some fun shots of the kids having a great time inhaling and exhaling to make the bags inflate and deflate:

With our second model, I had the kids pair up.  It was a good exercise in having a “lab partner.”  I found the instructions for this here.  Here are the finished products:

 

And finally, the experiment.  The kids each had a clear cup and were instructed to fill it halfway.  I gave them each a straw, and went to each cup, adding a few drops of Bromothymol Blue, which turned the water a nice, deep, blue color.  They took the straw and gently blew into the water.  They discovered that as they exhale, they breathe out a weak acid, called carbonic acid.  Because Bromothymol Blue is the active ingredient in liquid PH-testing solution, their breath turned the water yellow.  It took about 2-4 minutes for it to happen, but when it did, there were a whole lot of ooh’s and ahh’s.

You can find Bromothymol Blue in pet stores that carry a lot of choices for aquariums.  Most places only sell the PH-testing strips, but you need the solution.

Here are the kids finishing up the experiment:

Next week’s lab:  dissection!  Yay!