Tag Archives: co-op

Art – Bottle Birds

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For this project with my high schoolers, we recycled wine bottles.  In order to get enough bottles, I just had to ask my co-op, and viola, they appeared.  Don’t judge!

 

They started out by filling the bottle with pea gravel to weigh down the bottoms.  Then, they stuck a long, heavy gauge wire into the neck, and all the way down to the gravel.  After that, they used newspaper and masking tape to make the neck, head, and beaks of the birds.  I told them they could design this bird any way they wished, and we had some very ingenious outcomes!  They were also allowed cardboard to make the wings or any other body parts they liked.

Schooled in Love:  Bottle Birds

 

Once they had the body, neck, head, beak, and wings formed, the students paper mached the entire sculpture to create the bird.

After layering it with paper mache, they let it dry, and then primed it.  I hate buying primer, so I make it by using a one-to-one ratio of white acrylic paint to white school glue.  Once the primer dried, it was time to paint the birds.  They turned out beautifully!  I am so proud of my high school girls!

History – SOTW, Vol. 2: Chapter 29

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Mansa Musa

Mansa Musa

The kids enjoyed chapter 28 so much, that I decided to keep making slide shows for the different chapters we have left in the book.  It really helps them to remember everything when they have these slides to look at.  This particular chapter, about West Africa, specifically Ghana, Mali, and the Songhay empires, were a little on the confusing side because there was a lot going on in that area.

Here’s the slide show:  African Kingdoms

Blood and Guts – Eat Your Heart Out

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A neat project Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology has in it is building a heart using graham crackers and marshmallows.  We did it in class, and the kids loved it!  They especially loved eating it…

It’s a great way to teach about the heart, because it can be confusing!

Blood and Guts – Lapbook, Lessons 7 and 8

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We have had snow day after snow day after snow day here!  You’re probably wondering what homeschoolers do when there’s snow days.  Well, we sled and shovel, just like everyone else.  Also, remember that we have a large co-op, and we meet in an actual school building.  It really makes us appreciate the on-the-couch-in-pjs days.  However, this year has been a little more than unusual, and we’ve been trying to conduct school on a hot-or-miss basis.  And just in case Old Man Winter hasn’t heard it from the rest of the nation, we’re DONE with it.  Spring, please hurry up.

I decided to combine Lessons 7 and 8, because they work hand-in-hand.  In  Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology, Lesson 7 is Life in the Blood, and Lesson 8 is the Cardiovascular System.

Lapbook:  Lesson 1 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 2 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 3 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4B can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 6 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 9 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 10 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 11 can be found here.

For this section of our World’s Largest Mammoth Lapbooks, I used parts from Knowledge Box Central ( Chapters 1-7 can be found hereChapters 8-14 can be found here), Scholastic’s The Body Book, by Donald M. Silver and Patricia J. Wynne, Scholastic:  Easy Make & Learn Projects:  The Human Body (it’s downloadable – yes!), and my own foldables, available below.

This section will be attached to the main lapbook, behind the lung section.

L7 Experiment – Iron in Cereal (experiment card)

L7 Lapbook – Adrenaline

L7 Lapbook – Anemia

L7 Lapbook – Arteries Veins Capillaries

L7 Lapbook – Diagram of Diffusion (Draw, color, and label the diagram of diffusion on pg. 122.)

L7 Lapbook – Erythrocytes (What does this word mean, and where does it come from?)

L7 Lapbook – Functions of the Blood

L7 Lapbook – Hemoglobin

L7 Lapbook – oxygenated blood (Color the oxygenated blood cell red, and the deoxygenated blood cell blue.)

L7 Lapbook – Phagocytes

L7 Lapbook – Platelets

L7 Lapbook – What is Blood Made of (When you do the project suggested in the book, draw the red hots, lima bean, etc. in the jar and tell what each one represents on the inside.)

L7 Lapbook – White Blood Cells

L7 Pictures (Pictures you can include in your lapbook.)

L8 Lapbook – 4 chambers

L8 Lapbook – CPR

L8 Lapbook – Heart Attack

L8 Lapbook – Heart Blood Vessels

L8 Lapbook – Interventricular Septum

L8 Lapbook – Miles of Vessels

L8 Lapbook – Myocardium

L8 Lapbook – Pacemaker

L8 Lapbook – Pulmonary Veins

L8 Lapbook – Sedentary Lifestyle (The kids’ favorite foldable so far this year!)

L8 Lapbook – Two Main Veins

L8 Lapbook – Valves

L8 Pictures (Pictures you can include in your lapbook.)

And now for the pictures of how to put it all together:

Blood and Guts – Labook: Lesson 2

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We have just finished up the 2nd part of our lapbooks:  Lesson 2, The Skeletal System for Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology.  These things are becoming monstrous!  And we’re only on Lesson 2!  The original 10 file folders that I had the kids bring in will be used up completely by the 4th lesson, so I’ve already asked the parents to bring in more of them.

Lapbook:  Lesson 1 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 3 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4B can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 6 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lessons 7 and 8 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 9 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 10 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 11 can be found here.

I use parts from Knowledge Box Central:  Chapters 1-7 can be found here, and Chapters 8-14 can be found here, as well as  Scholastic’s The Body Book, by Donald M. Silver and Patricia J. Wynne.  I also make quite a few pieces myself (including the tests and answer keys), of which I’m sharing with you.  Hopefully, they will help you on your homeschooling journey, and you won’t have to get up every day at 5:00 am to put things like this together!

The Bone Labeling Game was a HUGE hit – especially when we played it relay-style!

We also did an easy project to show why God made our vertebrae with so many bones.  I gave out half of a straw and one pipe cleaner to each student.  I told them to thread the straw onto the pipe cleaner and then try to bend the straw.  The straw represents our backbone.  We wouldn’t be able to bend a vertebral column like that if God had given us one long bone.  Instead, He gave us many small bones, so I had the kids take the straw off the pipe cleaner, cut it into smaller pieces, and rethread the pieces.  Once again, I asked the students to bend the straw to show how many small bones help us to move, bend, and swivel.  They twisted the ends of the pipe cleaner together and added them in their lapbooks.

L2 Lapbook – Three Tiny Bones – This is a supplemental foldable.

L2 Lapbook – Osteo – This is a supplemental foldable.

L2 Lapbook – Ligaments – This is a supplemental foldable.

L2 Lapbook – Cartilage – This is a supplemental foldable.

L2 Lapbook – Bones make… – This is a supplemental foldable.

L2 Lapbook – Bone Dissection – This is a supplemental piece when dissecting the long bone.

L2 Lapbook – Bone Diseases – This is a supplemental page (because the kids like interesting medical phenomenon).

L2 Experiment – Brain-Skull Fluid – This is found on page 38.  Make sure you wrap tape around the plastic egg seam before dropping it!

L2 Experiment – Rubber Bones – This is found on page 53.  It’s also found all over the internet, if you need help.

L2 Experiment – Shock Absorber – This is found on page 43.

L2 Experiment – Synovial Fluid – This is found on page  51.

Here are the test and answer key for Lesson 2.  I also had the kids label a blank skeleton (found on page 31 of Apologia’s Anatomy Notebooking Journal for Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology).  Could these titles get ANY longer??

L2 Test

L2 Test – Answer Key

And now for the pictures!

Blood and Guts – Lapbook: Lesson 1

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Blood & Guts.  At least, that’s what we’re calling it, because the kids think it’s a cool name.  What we’re actually studying is Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology (whew!).

We’re creating this wicked-awesome lapbook in the class, and I just thought I’d take pictures of my example piece as we go, so in case you’ve got a hankering to make one, you won’t have to reinvent the wheel so much.

Before we go on, let me just start off by stating that I have 14 kiddos in my B&G class.  *cough*  I do have a fabulous helper, Mrs. Sharkey, but 14 is still a LOT when you have stuff to read, assignments, experiments, projects, dissections, and then… the lapbook.  The Lord grants me a tiny shred of sanity every time I think about this class, and I think that’s why I keep going.  I also keep thinking maybe someday I’ll get a raise.  Oh. Wait.  I homeschool.

The base of the lapbook is from Knowledge Box Central.  (****UPDATE (10/15/2017)****  KBC moved their link.  It used to be divided in two purchases, but they’ve combined it into one.  Smart move on their part!)  Chapters 1-14 can be found here.

I could have stopped there, as it’s a nice lapbook, BUT… I didn’t.

I wanted to add body parts the kids could color, so I used Scholastic’s The Body Book, by Donald M. Silver and Patricia J. Wynne.  Now, THIS book is SO COOL!  You’ll see most of the parts as we progress through the year.  I could have stopped there, as now we have the makings of an awesome lapbook, BUT… I didn’t.

Now it’s my turn to step up the game.  I wanted to emphasize certain sections as well as create extra parts for our experiments and projects, so the .PDF files you’ll see listed below are ones I created to fill in some blanks and make it wicked-awesome.  Kind-of like Emeril:  Bam!  Kick it up a notch!

Please note that most of these lapbook parts I’ve created are with the idea that more than one student are being taught (I have 14 kids, remember!), and I try to conserve paper by having multiple foldables, etc. on one sheet.  If you’re only teaching one child, you’ll have extra parts.

Here’s what I have to add to Lesson 1:

L1 Lapbook – Humors – This is a supplemental foldable.

L1 Lapbook – Spontaneous Generation – This is a supplemental foldable.

L1 Lapbook – DNA – This is a supplemental foldable.

L1 Experiment – Mummifying an Apple – This can be found on page 21.

L1 Experiment – How Magnification Works – This can be found on page 26.

L1 Experiment – Choosy Cell – This can be found in Apologia’s Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy Notebooking Journal, Lesson 1.

We also test in this class, and unfortunately, Apologia doesn’t have a “teacher’s manual” or a “test booklet,” so that just means we homeschoolers have to come up with one on our own in order to supplement our needs.  So, below you’ll find the test I created.  As an added blessing, there’s an answer key for you as well.

L1 Test

L1 Test – Answer Key

Want to see what the lapbook looks like?  I’ll show you Lesson 1.  I’ve already started building Lesson 2, and you’ll see a little peek of it. but you’ll have to wait until we’ve finished before I show you that one.

Here are the rest of the lapbook parts available:

Lapbook:  Lesson 2 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 3 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 4B can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 6 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lessons 7 and 8 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 9 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 10 can be found here.

Lapbook:  Lesson 11 can be found here.

 

Level 1 Art – Water Bottle Fishes

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Yes, “fishes” is correct:  they’re different species.  😉

To start, you’ll need the following for each student:  1 disposable water bottle, 1 12-inch dowel rod, 1 4 x 4 wooden block.

You will also need:  scissors (or an exacto knife), masking tape, scrap cardboard, a drill (with a bit the size of your dowel rod), newspaper, flour, water, a hand-mixer, mixing bowl, cheap toilet paper, joint compound, vegetable oil, Elmer’s Glue-All (NOT school glue), modge podge, sponge brushes, tissue paper, large google-eyes, Aileen’s Tacky Glue, and sequins.

First things, first.  Remove the outer wrapping, lid, and ring from the water bottle.  Drill a hole in your wooden block and push one end of the dowel rod into it.  If it’s loose, add a little glue-all to it to help it stay put.  Using your scissors (or exacto knife), cut a SMALL slit on the side of the water bottle.  Push the other end of the dowel rod all the way into the bottle.  If it’s loose, use a piece of masking tape to secure it.

Cut out fish parts from the cardboard, like the fins and tail.  Tape those to the water bottle.  Rip SMALL pieces (about 2-3 inches) of newspaper, and set them aside.

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Here you can see the skeletal structure.

In a mixing bowl, put about a cup of flour, and add enough water to where it becomes the consistency of pancake batter.  Dip a piece of newspaper into the batter and pull it through your index and middle fingers to wipe it off.  Press it to the water bottle, and smooth out any wrinkles.  Once the water bottle and cardboard pieces are completely covered (make sure to look under it!), let it dry.  Add another layer of paper mache.

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This is the first layer of newspaper on the fish. See the dowel rod? When we first started the project, I used bamboo skewers, not even thinking about the weight of the sculpture. Duh! Anyway, after getting real dowel rods, having them cut down to thirds, and re-drilling the hold in the wooden block, all was well in the world of Mrs. Darby’s art class.

To create the paper mache clay, remove the toilet paper from the roll, and soak it in a bowl of warm water.  Squeeze the water out of it, and pull it apart in very small chunks into a mixing bowl.  Add 3/4 cup of Elmer’s Glue-All, 1 cup of joint compound, 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil, and a 1/2 cup of flour.  Mix on low for about 20 seconds, then mix on high for about 30 seconds.

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Here is the big bucket o’ paper mache clay, ready to go!

Once the fish is dry, smear on the paper mache clay in a VERY THIN layer, smoothing it out as you go.  I made sure there were tubs of warm water at each table for when the kids were done.  I didn’t want to pour that down the sink.  Let the fish dry.

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Abby puts on a thin layer of paper mache clay. This helps to fill any gaps missed and to smooth out any weird spots. Notice the new, thicker, stronger dowel rod?

You’re finally ready for the colorful part!  Cut small pieces of tissue paper and adhere with modge podge (I made ours by thinning white school glue with water).  Let dry.

When you're ready to add color, saturate the area with modge podge with a sponge brush.  Then add a piece of tissue paper and cover the area with modge podge to seal it.

When you’re ready to add color, saturate the area with modge podge with a sponge brush. Then add a piece of tissue paper and cover the area with modge podge to seal it.

This one’s ready for the next step:  Embellishment!

All the tissue paper is on!  Now to add the details...

All the tissue paper is on! Now to add the details…

Add the google-eyes and layer the sequins like scales in some areas.  Done!  🙂

Schooled in Love:  Water Bottle Fish

This project took us about 6 class periods to finish.