Monthly Archives: July 2013

Summer Art Camp – Hippos

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The original idea for this came from this artwork.  Isn’t Melanie Mikecz so talented??  I love her stuff.  This was such an easy project for all the kids to follow, and every age loved them!

Teacher Sample

Teacher Sample

Here are the kids diligently working:

We used watercolors to make the water.

We used watercolors to make the water.

Here are some completed ones.  Aren’t they adorable?

Schooled in Love:  Hippos

Schooled in Love:  Hippos

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What Stuck With Your Brain Today?

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Schooled in Love:  BrainI saw some versions of this on Pinterest, so I wanted to make one with my own style.  I taped two pink pieces of paper together, and on the other side, I drew a brain.  It’s a mighty nice Medulla Oblongata, if I say so myself!  I cut out lightening bolts to make it an active brain, and laminated the whole thing.

The idea is that when my class is over, the kids have to fill out a Post-It Note of what they remember from class, and stick it to the poster.

Three cheers for ways to recall learning!

Summer Art Camp – Electric Guitars

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The original idea for this can be found here.  What a fun project, and they all turned out so nicely!

First things first - draw the guitar.  We also traced a couple of stars.

First things first – draw the guitar. We also traced a couple of stars on a separate piece of paper.

Next, begin the coloring process.  I instructed the kids to wait until all the coloring was done before outlining in black.  This little lad didn't listen - wouldn't you know, he's my son.

Next, begin the coloring process. I instructed the kids to wait until all the coloring was done before outlining in black. This little lad didn’t listen – wouldn’t you know, he’s my son.

Check out some of these designs!

We wove black and white paper together, color and cut out our stars, and mounted them onto the checkerboard.  We rocked out loud!

Schooled in Love:  Electric Guitars

Summer Art Camp – Chalk Pastels with Glue Resist

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These chalk pastels using the glue resist method turned out brilliantly!

Here are the 4th-5th grade pieces:

The ones below are from my 6th grade – high school ages.  They did theirs in themed panels, and they turned out great!

Makayla went with a floral theme.

Makayla went with a floral theme.

Emma decided on an ocean theme.  There's even a mermaid tail sticking out!

Emma decided on an ocean theme. There’s even a mermaid tail sticking out!

Gavin's space theme includes a rocket, a planet, and a sun.

Gavin’s space theme includes a rocket, a planet, and a sun.

This is one of my favorites because Katie's jungle theme has such cute animals!

This is one of my favorites because Katie’s jungle theme has such cute animals!

For all you Sci-Fi fans, Max's Dr. Who theme was so much fun!  The panels are a bow tie and a fez, because (according to the Doctor), they're both cool.

For all you Sci-Fi fans, Max’s Dr. Who theme was so much fun! The panels are a bow tie and a fez, because (according to the Doctor), they’re both cool.

 

Mia's beach theme was so fun!

Mia’s beach theme was so fun!

 

Claudia's happy face was so vibrant!

Claudia’s happy face was so vibrant!

 

Cozzi made a beautiful floral print.

Cozzi made a beautiful floral print.

 

In this theme, Dominic wanted to convey freedom.  He's got a flag, a map, and a chicken breaking out of a gate!

In this theme, Dominic wanted to convey freedom. He’s got a flag, a map, and a chicken breaking out of a gate!

 

 

 

 

 

Where Does My Art Go Today?

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I saw a few versions of this sign floating around Pinterest, and I thought the idea would make an improvement to my classroom stream-lining.  Crossing fingers…

Schooled in Love:  Where Does My Art Go Today?

 

If you want one pre-made, I have it available here:  Where does my art go today?  Just print it, mount it on cardstock, and laminate it, so it becomes a dry-erase board.

Magnetic Interchangeable Supply List

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How many times do we have to say, “You’ll need a pencil, your grading pen, colored markers, scissors, etc.”?  Too many times to count!  Last year I started “training” my kids to look at the chalkboard at the beginning of each class, so they knew what to get out.  I didn’t start it until the last couple weeks of school, but I saw (and felt) an incredible turn-around.  I just LOVE to help kids become self-sufficient – and they love consistency!

This year, in my effort to make things more stream-lined, and because I’m artsy-fartsy (AND because I have a new metal cabinet in my room in order for this to work), I made a magnetic interchangeable supply list!  Take a look!

I did this by hand, but you could just as easily print it from a computer.  I just had a LOT of extra paper scraps that I had on hand.

After making the header, I wrote out all the supplies I could think of on leftover scrapbook pieces.  Then I cut them out, and laminated them.  I’m sure there will be more obscure supplies needed during the year, and for those, I have laminated blank pieces of paper.  Finally, I stuck magnetic strips on the back of everything – including the header.

Schooled in Love:  Magnetic Supply List

The header in on the front of the cabinet, and the supply parts are stored on the side of it, out of view from the students:

Schooled in Love:  Magnetic Supply List

Clip-On Name Tags

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I needed a way to let people know whose art belonged to whom, without writing their names on the front – so I came up with this!  The names are reusable and interchangeable, and no more holes in the student’s work!  Yay for art teachers (ANY teacher) everywhere!

You'll need E-6000 glue, some clothespins, and some thumbtacks.

You’ll need E-6000 glue, some clothespins, and some thumbtacks.

 

Glue the tacks onto the clothespins.  Notice which end they're glued on.

Glue the tacks onto the clothespins. Notice which end they’re glued on.  Let it dry overnight.

 

While the glue is drying, run to Walmart and grab a bunch of paint chips.

While the glue is drying, run to Walmart and grab a bunch of paint chips.

 

Cut the paint chips apart.  You don't want the extra-dark ones.

Cut the paint chips apart. You don’t want the extra-dark ones.

 

Make sure you grab Velcro dots from the store as well.

Make sure you grab Velcro dots from the store as well.  You could also use strips or squares.  The shape doesn’t matter – just the size.

 

Cut all the Velcro dots in half.

Cut all the Velcro dots in half.

 

When the E-6000 has dried, turn the clip over, and stick on one half of the hook-side of the Velcro dots.

When the E-6000 has dried, turn the clip over, and stick on one half of the hook-side of the Velcro dots.

 

Write the names of your students on the paint chips, using a Sharpie.

Write the names of your students on the paint chips, using a Sharpie.

 

Turn the paint chip over, and stick on the fuzzy (loop) side of the Velcro dot.

Turn the paint chip over, and stick on the fuzzy (loop) side of the Velcro dot.

 

Stick the paint chip to the clothespin.

Stick the paint chip to the clothespin.

 

Hang up your artist's work by clipping the name clothespin + another, and pushing the tack into the cork.

Hang up your artist’s work by clipping the name clothespin + another, and pushing the tack into the cork.